Royal Fort House was built in 1758-62 on the site of a Civil War fortification for Thomas Tyndall. The house is distinct demonstrating three different architectural styles: Baroque, Palladian and Rococo due to a compromise between three different architects submitting designs. The landscape garden was a later addition and designed by Sir Humphry Repton in order to screen the house from the increasing urban sprawl.

Jeppe Hein’s work encourages playful encounters and often surprises its audiences by playing with optical phenomena, or creating scenarios in which members of the public are encouraged to interact with each other or with the artwork directly. For Royal Fort Gardens, Hein created a square formation of 76 vertical polished steel plates sited at the base of an incline leading down from Royal Fort House. Entering the labyrinth, the surrounding landscape and participants are multiplied through a dizzying set of reflections.

Initially Hein was inspired by the University as a place of learning and self-discovery. “The work”, he suggest, “responds to the history of the University’s site, in particular the original 18th century design of the landscape gardener Sir Humphry Repton, whose garden designs similarly sought to invoke imaginative encounters”.

Listen: An interview with Jeppe Hein

About the Artist

Jeppe Hein was born in Denmark in 1974. Hein’s work encourages playful encounters and often surprises its audiences by playing with optical phenomena or by creating scenarios in which members of the public are encouraged to interact with each other or with the artwork directly.

Funders and Supporters

Follow Me was funded and commissioned by The University of Bristol. Situations produced the artwork as part of the University’s centenary celebrations.

Photographs

Photographs featured taken by Jamie Woodley

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